Huge Opportunity and Market Potential in Indonesia

Huge Opportunity and Market Potential in Indonesia

Many businesses fly under the radar of the authorities, and others choose to take over from existing businesses that have already completed the required paperwork. If you do decide to start your own business, it’s worth it to hire a local fixer to guide you through the process. This will usually cost around $500 for a small business and will save you a lot of time and headaches.

Indonesia saddles would-be entrepreneurs with a plethora of procedures to follow, and the average number of days it takes to register a business clocks in at 85– much more than in neighboring countries.
Make contact with as many expat business people as possible to get a better understanding of the business environment here. Network and go to the many business networking events. The British Chamber of Commerce is one of the most active in Indonesia and accepts guests and associate members of all nationalities.”

Out of 183 economies, the World Bank has ranked Indonesia 104th in terms of ease of setting up a new business. Indonesia saddles would-be entrepreneurs with a plethora of procedures to follow, and the average number of days it takes to register a business clocks in at 85– much more than in neighboring countries. Registering a business in Indonesia is complicated and expensive, and if you’re from one of the growing number of countries that prohibit their citizens from paying bribes abroad– and in fact will prosecute them for doing so– you’re looking at some tough choices.

There are no easy answers, but be assured that slowly but surely things are getting better. Despite all of this, the Indonesian government is very pro-business, and allows 100-percent foreign-owned companies, unlike some of their neighbors.

A fair amount of palm-greasing, or “tea money,” is required to start a business. If you don’t, your taxes won’t get registered as being paid.

If you’re looking for more information on doing business in Indonesia, contact the EU Indonesia Business Network or contact your local Indonesian Business Chamber.

Interview with an Expat
” It seems that many people come to Indonesia with preconceived ideas, and a lot of times those ideas do not match the realities of this quickly changing market. If you plan to work here or start a business, take your time, get to know the country and the market, and be ready to adjust your plans accordingly.”

Many businesses fly under the radar of the authorities, and others choose to take over from existing businesses that have already completed the required paperwork. Make contact with as many expat business people as possible to get a better understanding of the business environment here.

” Be patient. Do not try and set up your new business in one day. Do your business research and market research.

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